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Teruko Taketo, PhD

Scientist, RI-MUHC, Glen site

Child Health and Human Development Program

Professor, Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University

 

Keywords


ovary • oocyte • meiosis • apoptosis • sex chromosome

Research Focus


My research focuses on the surveillance mechanism of female germ cells (future eggs, named oocytes) during the meiotic prophase, which takes place in fetal and neonatal ovaries of most mammalian species. During this period, paternal and maternal homologous chromosomes (genome-containing structures) pair and recombine in oocytes; these events are essential for proper segregation of chromosomes at meiotic cell divisions and genetic diversity in the offspring. I hypothesize that oocytes which fail to properly pair or recombine will be eliminated, thus minimizing the risk of aneuploidy (abnormal chromosome number) in embryos. My first objective is to clarify the mechanism which recognizes meiotic errors and leads to oocyte elimination. My second objective is to examine the fate, particularly embryonic development, of the oocytes which have circumvented the surveillance elimination.

Selected Publications


Click on Pubmed to see my current publications list

  • Taketo T, Lee C-H, Zhang J, Li Y-M, Lee C-YG, Lau Y-FC (2005) Expression of SRY proteins in both normal and sex-reversed XY fetal mouse gonads. Developmental Dynamics 233: 612-622. PMID: 15789443.

  • McClellan KA, Gosden R, Taketo T (2003) Continuous loss of oocytes throughout meiotic prophase in the normal mouse ovary. Developmental Biology 258: 334-348. PMID: 12798292.

  • Ene AC, Park S, Edelmann W, Taketo T (2013) Caspase 9 is constitutively activated in mouse oocytes and plays a key role in oocyte elimination during meiotic prophase progression. Developmental Biology 377: 213-223. PMID: 23384561.

  • Taketo T, Naumova A (2013) Oocyte heterogeneity with respect to the meiotic silencing of unsynapsed X chromosomes in the XY female mouse. Chromosoma 122: 337-349. PMID: 23760560.

  • Obata Y, Villemure M, Kono T, Taketo T (2008) Transmission of Y-chromosomes from XY female mice was made possible by replacement of cytoplasm during oocyte maturation. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 105: 13918-13923. PMID: 18772381.